Crossways Farm

This is our third study site in Norfolk.  Frog ghost was originally filled-in with limited success; during a dry spell the pond was ploughed in and planted with crops, but subsequent wet winters meant it was never dry enough to harvest, and eventually the ghost was abandoned and left to its own devices as a weedy patch in the field.  Swift pond (named after the speed with which it has since filled with water), is located in the adjacent field to Frog ghost.  This pond had terrestrialised almost completely, thanks to the abundant willow, and all that remained was a shallow hollow and small patch of irises.

Both ponds are now doing well, and are expected to be full of frog spawn come the spring.

Frog ghost before excavation - this is a younger ghost pond, which is still quite evident in the landscape.  In fact, from a distance you could be fooled into thinking that it is still a pond, but on closer inspection you would find there is no water, and the ground is quite solid and not at all boggy.  There are some wet land associated plants (including reed canary grass), but mostly the ghost has been colonised by stinging nettles.

Frog ghost before excavation – this is a younger ghost pond, which is still quite evident in the landscape. In fact, from a distance you could be fooled into thinking that it is still a pond, but on closer inspection you would find there is no water, and the ground is quite solid and not at all boggy. There are some wet land associated plants (including reed canary grass), but mostly the ghost has been colonised by stinging nettles.

Swift pond before restoration.  A typical overgrown pond; lots of willow, not much water, very little aquatic life.

Swift pond before restoration. A typical overgrown pond; lots of willow, not much water, very little aquatic life.

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